Yankees, Marlins Linked By Past And Future: Spring Training Gets Underway

And So It Begins On Tuesday in Miami, Derek Jeter, the CEO of the Miami Marlins, was looking ahead to the team’s opening of training camp and his first...

And So It Begins

On Tuesday in Miami, Derek Jeter, the CEO of the Miami Marlins, was looking ahead to the team’s opening of training camp and his first appearance at such an occasion since his final season with the New York Yankees in 2014.

The Marlins will wear their usual uniforms and probably add “HELLO, My name is …” stickers. Because many of the former Marlins are gone from the roster of manager (and former Yankee) Don Mattingly.

Across Florida’s narrow central width on Tuesday, the Yankees new manager, Aaron Boone, was dealing with the exact opposite of Jeter’s circumstance. The Marlins, denuded of talent, aren’t expected to win anything and will play in front of empty seats. The Yankees, enriched by the acquisition from the Marlins of slugger Giancarlo Stanton, are a favorite to win the American League pennant and perhaps more. Boone played for the Marlins in 2007.

The Marlins stripped themselves of National League MVP Stanton, his 59 home runs and the rest of the starting outfield to cut costs; the Yankees want to win championships again and income (and outgo) for them is no problem. They love the pairing of Stanton and Aaron Judge (52 homers as a rookie) and expect to build on last year’s run to the AL Championship Series.

“At the end of the day you want all the buzz that’s certainly apparent when I’m back in New York, and all the excitement that’s being generated by where we are as a franchise,” Boone said.

Buzz? If there’s even a dull hum in Miami, it is from the fade of outrage to a quiet undercurrent of despair and the snoring already snoozing at the thought of the Marlins on the field. The Marlins haven’t had a winning season since 2009 and it’s difficult to picture another one until at least 2021 and probably beyond.

The Marlins finally rid themselves of problematic owner Jeffrey Loria, only to purge their payroll under new management as Loria twice did. Jeter may be the new boss, but he sure seems like the old boss.
 
 
Post By: Larry Weisman, a longtime sportswriter for USA TODAY, blogs for Twistity.com. Follow him on Twitter @MrLarryWeisman

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