Fly, Eagles Fly: But Don’t Cry With Carson Wentz Out And Nick Foles At QB

A Quarterback Change In Philadelphia The Philadelphia Eagles knew the worst of it almost immediately on Sunday at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Quarterback Carson Wentz came up limping...

A Quarterback Change In Philadelphia

The Philadelphia Eagles knew the worst of it almost immediately on Sunday at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Quarterback Carson Wentz came up limping after a play at the goal line in the third quarter, finished that series and then left the field under his own power.

As Nick Foles stepped in and helped the Eagles to a 43-35 win over the Los Angeles Rams, Wentz was undergoing medical tests. An MRI on Monday confirmed a torn ACL in his left knee. Out for the rest of the season, including the playoffs.

This is no small loss. The second-year star has thrown 33 touchdown passes and only 7 interceptions as the Eagles (11-2) have clinched their first NFC East title since 2013. But where do they go from here?

Oddly, to Foles. A third-round pick by the Eagles in 2012, Foles started 24 games over three seasons and seemed a worthy heir to Donovan McNabb. In 2013, he threw 27 TD passes and only 2 interceptions.

Foles didn’t fit as well in Chip Kelly’s offense over the next two seasons and was traded to the Rams (then in St. Louis) and next bounced to the Kansas City Chiefs. He rejoined the Eagles in the spring, fully knowing he would be Wentz’s backup and that backups often must play at crunch time.

“I’m absolutely ready,” Foles said.

Bravo. Everyone on the Eagles will need to pick his game up a bit with Wentz gone, but the club can pound the ball on the ground with LeGarrette Blount and Jay Ajayi and Foles showed in at least one season he can play at a high level.

With the division won, the Eagles can concentrate on retooling their offense a bit for Foles, who is less of a runner than Wentz. But the Eagles’ goal of winning a championship – and they are 0-2 in the Super Bowl era – won’t change.

They just need to do it with the understudy in the spotlight instead of the star.

 
 
Post By: Larry Weisman, a longtime sportswriter for USA TODAY, blogs for Twistity.com. Follow him on Twitter @MrLarryWeisman

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