Andrew Luck’s Retirement Brings Out The Worst In The People Who Should Have Appreciated Him The Most

They are entitled and spoiled. Hyper-critical and overly sensitive Pro athletes? No. Fans. The spin following Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck’s sudden retirement on Saturday night is that the...

(Photo Credit: AP Photo/AJ Mast)

They are entitled and spoiled. Hyper-critical and overly sensitive

Pro athletes?

No. Fans.

The spin following Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck’s sudden retirement on Saturday night is that the booing that followed him came from a small segment of fans and that Indianapolis really loves him.

Ok. Sure. And some of that small segment apparently thinks the Colts were using Luck to sell season tickets and have demanded refunds. And you can find plenty of stuff on social media – the great cesspool of our day – slamming Luck for quitting at 29 because his mind and body are worn down from the grind of football and that he wants to be able to live a normal life.

Fans. They begrudge the athletes their salaries but buy jerseys with the player names on them. They rip players for kneeling during the national anthem, but they themselves can’t be roused from their couches to stand at home for anything but a trip to the kitchen or the bathroom.

Fans. They second-guess, they call radio stations to torch players, they question their dedication to a brutal sport that inflicts lifelong damage, and then, at the end of a player’s career, have no sympathy for the mental and physical sufferings so many endure.

Junior Seau. Dave Duerson. Ray Easterling. These former NFL players killed themselves rather than live with mood swings, forgetfulness, headaches, and overall mental decline. Others have retired early rather than risk that sort of future.

The Colts could have and should have handled Luck’s situation more discretely. Luck? He made a decision right for him and his family, not some guy in Section 228, Row B, Seat 8.

Imagine how serious this must be for a potential all-time great who is the son of a former football player to walk away.

Fans. Appreciate what these players go through. Never believe you could do this yourself. You want to boo bad plays or bad teams? Go for it.

Don’t dog people making decisions to save their lives. Just don’t.

 
 
Post By: Larry Weisman, a longtime sportswriter for USA TODAY, blogs for Twistity.com. Follow him on Twitter @MrLarryWeisman

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